The Full Monty – Covered Bridge Tour


NorthfieldFallsCoveredBridge.jpg

This 39 mile driving tour that begins at the MRV Chamber Visitors Center takes a leisurely one and a half hours that brings you through 7 covered bridges while offering spectacular views and pleasant opportunities to sample the local flavor along the way. Here are the bridges you’ll discover along the way;

  • The Great Eddy Bridge, also known as the Waitsfield covered bridge, is the oldest operating covered bridge in the state. It was built in 1833 and restored in 1975, and it has the longest clear span of any Burr truss bridge in Vermont, spanning an incredible 105 feet.
  • Pine Brook Bridge, also in Waitsfield, was built in 1872. Its structure has never been altered over the years, but its 48-foot span is still just as impressive.
  • The Upper Cox bridge, built about 1872, is one of the only bridges from which you can see another covered bridge in the distance. The photo opportunity here is too good to pass up.  From the Upper Cox Bridge, you can see through the Newell Bridge, also known as the Lower Coxbrook Bridge, to the Station Bridge (also called the Northfield Falls Bridge) just to the east. It’s a truly magical part of this drive.
  • The Northfield Falls Bridge was built in 1872 and is one of the longest bridges in the state at 137 feet.
  • The Slaughter House Bridge, built about 1872, stands at an impressive 55 feet long. This is the only bridge in the Northfield area that hasn’t been altered and still exists in its original condition today.
  • The Tiny Mosely Bridge was built in 1899 and renovated in 1971. The bridge is 39 feet long
  • Finally, you’re back in Warren, where you’ll find the beautiful Warren Bridge. It’s a prominent symbol of our town and was built in 1880. The bridge, which spans the Mad River, has a unique feature. There are different portal openings at either end of the 59-foot-long bridge.

Covered Bridges are wicked interesting as are bridges generally. Sarah, a Girl Scout from New Hampshire working on her “Think Like and Engineer” merit badge, suggested we include a link to a content-rich website about bridges which also has additional links and more information about covered bridges than you can shake a stick at! Thanks for the suggestion Sarah!